Square One offers much in the way of elevator music, nothing more

Kenn Starr has been quiet for a while. The D.C. local made some noise with his Low Budget Crew a few years ago, but has been pretty quiet since being praised for his last release It’s Still Real.

Well, there isn’t much to praise on Square One. Kenn’s delivery has the impact of mosquito weight jabs and some of the production sounds like it would have been sub-par five years ago. “Say Goodbye” is nod worthy, not because its rhythm is catchy, but because it’s hard not to fall asleep while listening. Much of the album has a very similar feel. Familiar chops and drums with so little punch, you have to actually listen for them. Songs like “The Definition”, featuring Melanie Rutherford, are so messy and convoluted it’s hard to understand whether it’s a love song, break up song or a straight freestyle.

Square One can be described as rap elevator music – soft in soul, but hard in lyrics – the type of music that would be fun to hear while travelling up the escalator, but loses its appeal after 118 seconds.

Kenn does have some decent lyricism. “Exodus” has some fun wordplay and “Game to Deliver” featuring Wordsworth and Superstition shows some personality. Too bad it comes at the very end of the album. Some of the native tongue cuts like “Product of the Basement (Remix)” and “Lesson A” do have some authentic appeal, but are still amateur.

Square One can be described as rap elevator music – soft in soul, but hard in lyrics – the type of music that would be fun to hear while travelling up the escalator, but loses its appeal after 118 seconds.

@MaajinnBluu