Fresh off the release of Kardi Gras Vol. 1: The Clash, Kardinal Offishall has started 2016 strong with a powerful music video accompanying one of the project’s most hard-hitting records, “No Reason”.

With the commanding verses and catchy chorus in this four-minute cut, Kardinal raises thoughts on various topics pertaining to today’s Black youth – from the influences which may be developing a noticeably detrimental sense of stereotypical ignorance among them, to how they’ve been treated by law enforcement, especially in recent times. He urges his audience to listen close and pay real attention to what he spits.

Kardinal Offishall at the celebration for the release of his latest project, Kardi Gras Vol. 1: The Clash.

Kardinal Offishall at the celebration for the release of his latest project, Kardi Gras Vol. 1: The Clash.

Through the Cazhhmere-directed video for this infectious track, Kardinal Offishall exemplifies the meaning of his lyrics by presenting them through an energetic performance while donning a ski mask in the heart of Toronto – reflecting the somewhat unruly liveliness some of today’s youth associate themselves with.

Even with this critique of the group he aspires to uplift, the rap veteran describes his perspective on the song’s subject in deeper detail when he simultaneously acknowledges the role that the police play in the current condition of the youth.

Me and 5-0 is like apartheid / They say I work for the wrong side / I try to be friendly, but most of ’em would want to send me to prison without a key because I’m Black and I’m free / I’mma ride for the yout dem / I don’t care what they say, don’t shoot them / The more that you become the enemy, is the more that the killers and whores are gonna recruit them…” he raps.

Through thoroughly describing the dichotomy that exists between the ‘reasonless,’ spirited brashness of the youth and their mistreatment at the hands of authority, the Toronto-bred rapper successfully opens up an important discussion on a significant issue. He does it all without sounding too preachy, thanks to his excellent delivery atop some very slick, bouncy production.

Photos By. Chantal ‘Rose’ Gregory Urbanology Magazine