JLab's game changing headphones won’t break the bank

Ever since Beats by Dre entered the pop culture vernacular, headphones have become more than a conduit for music. They have become an identifier, a fashion statement.

In 2015, it’s necessary to have multiple options. Maybe a pair of Turtle Beach fully enclosed headphones with a mic for gaming and a pair of those ubiquitous white iPhone ear buds you can stuff in your bag. However, there are those of us who need that perfect mix of audio excellence and versatility.

JLab Audio has been a disruptive force in the consumer audio space for a few years now and the brand’s new Flex Headphones continue that trend.

These are some of the most well built headphones you can find for $69.99.

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Urbanology’s Senior Writer & The Curb podcast co-host, MaajinnBluu, trying out the Flex Headphones. // Photo By. Isa Ransome © Urbanology Magazine

They fold up and fit neatly into the accompanying case, which take their portability factor through the roof. They feel premium, with a stylish gunmetal finish and are well padded, which only adds to the lightweight comfort.

During my morning commute I got more than a few glances as people tried to decipher the logo on the ear cups.
Speaking of ear cups, the trademarked Form-Fit Earcups are a welcome change to the standard circular pattern and really make the difference during long sessions. On my flight from Toronto to Orlando I fell asleep, and when I woke up, I completely forgot I had them on.

The flat detachable cord makes all the difference. While shorter than most DJs would prefer, it’s tangle free and snag free – both major pluses for everyday use.

Urbanology's Senior Writer & The Curb podcast co-host, MaajinnBluu, trying out the Flex Headphones. // Photo By. Isa Ransome © Urbanology Magazine

Urbanology’s Senior Writer & The Curb podcast co-host, MaajinnBluu, trying out the Flex Headphones. // Photo By. Isa Ransome © Urbanology Magazine

The headphones also include a microphone making them the perfect over the ear option for smartphones. The controls don’t go beyond stop/play, rewind and fast-forward, and while it sucks to have to pull out your device to adjust the volume, more controls would’ve probably upped its retail price.

The Flex set did well in the club as well. They felt light and sounded clear while spinning at a house party – no need for the patented DJ head tilt to hear the cue. The Flex phones stayed glued to my head and the swivel ear cups made it easy to pretend I was listening to a drunken partygoer’s request.

If JLab can maintain this level of design and make it wireless, the company would have a repeat customer on their hands.

Most importantly, the JLab Flex headphones sound great for the price point. Sure, you could cough up three or four times the price of the Flex and get a little more bass reproduction, but none of that matters when listening to crappy mp3s. The Flex handles dangerous decibels without distorting and communicates highs crisply.

My one complaint is that there is no Bluetooth option. A fully cordless Flex might be at a higher price point, but if JLab can maintain this level of design and make it wireless, the company would have a repeat customer on their hands.

Whether you’re a DJ on a budget, a student looking for something more bottom end or just someone looking for a good over the ear substitute for your smartphone’s standard ear buds, the JLab Flex is a great option.

And, at well under $100, you may even want to buy a few, given the approach of the holiday season.

Photos By. Isa Ransome © Urbanology Magazine